High Demand For Diamorphine Doses To Combat Heroine Addiction In Uk

High Demand For Diamorphine Doses To Combat Heroine Addiction In Uk

By Eric King And Charlotte Webster-

Heroine  addicts all over the Uk will demand the  daily doses of diamorphine offered in the North of England as  from next week as part of plans to  undermine drug dealers.

The announcement made yesterday that 15 of Middlesbrough’s most at-risk individuals  for whom all other treatments have failed will be able to visit a clinical facility twice daily, seven days a week, will face the test  of its success once implemented.

Several heroine addicts desperate to give up will demand a try of the recommended cure. Many addicts have tried in vain to give up the deadly habit which have kept thousands in chains for decades. Some addicts are so stupidly hooked that they inject themselves in the corners of their groins. Many have lost their limbs as a result of excessive heroine use.  News that some of their fellow addicts will benefit from a prescribed treatment expected to kill the craving will make others feel left out. Most addicts are not even aware of the news, and it could take a while for them all to find out.

However, The Eye Of Media.Com have gone out of our way to inform addicts in Birmingham, London, and Essex of the news to gauge their reaction. Addicts are easy to spot and some are already known to our research team who take an interest in the history and psychology of drug addicts. 19 out of 30 drug addicts in Leytonstone, East London and Basildon combined said they would do anything that will help them give up their addiction.

Users will be able inject pharmaceutical-grade heroin provided by the authorities under medical supervision. Subsequent assistance to support the mental health of addicts and help them secure housing and find employment. If successful, the introduction will limit the profitability of drug dealers who would have to rely on their sale of crack cocaine or focus on the several hundreds or thousands who cannot access the diamorphine. Efforts should be made to make it available to as many who demand and request it.

The clinical lead, Daniel Ahmed, said the 12-month pilot of the heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) programme would provide some of the most in-need people with an opportunity to change their lives.

“They are on a cycle of offending, committing crime to raise funds for street heroin, being arrested and going to prison, being released and offending again,” he said. “The cycle often only ends when they die, often in the street.”
Each individual will be medically assessed before being prescribed appropriate courses of diamorphine. “This removes the constant need to commit crime in order to fund street heroin addiction,” Ahmed added.

Barry Coppinger, the Cleveland police and crime commissioner who is helping to fund the scheme said:
“The policies of the past have failed,” he said. “If we are serious about tackling and preventing addiction, we need to listen to the experts, take notice of the evidence and act decisively.
“Police need to continue to relentlessly target the organised gangs and dealers behind the supply of street heroin and, at the same time, we need to provide effective treatment to release users from their snares and take early preventive action to prevent others becoming addicted.”

 

P.S: This article was contributed to by both writers

 

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