New Sentencing Guidelines For Harassment And Revenge Porn

New Sentencing Guidelines For Harassment And Revenge Porn

By Sammie Jones-

New Sentencing guidelines have been expanded to address the psychological harm caused to victims of  coercive behaviour and revenge porn.

The new guidelines provides more  legal leverage for victims of stalking, harassment or revenge porn to successfully prosecute offenders. Coercive behaviour includes those people  who deny their partners access to friends, or impose their wishes on them as far as their choice of clothing and where they are allowed to go.

The aim is to provide greater protection to victims of stalking harassment from current or past partners in general, but also covers any body guilty of committing any of the offences under the areas highlighted by the new sentencing guidelines.

The guidance covers stalking, the disclosure of private sexual images (commonly known as ‘revenge porn’), and controlling and coercive behaviour. They are also an expression of parliament to expand the scope of the law that embody those offences.

Under new guidelines,  pornography offenders who repeatedly re-post explicit material after it has been taken offline will face the toughest punishments. Culprits who set up fake social media profiles or websites to humiliate lovers or ex lovers, can also expect to receive the harshest penalties available.

This means oppressive men who violate their partners rights by restricting their movements or access to social media, or any forceful or coercive behaviour, will result in severe punishment for the offenders.

The council has added that leaving the victim in debt, destitute or homeless due to their finances being exploited, will be considered an aggravating factor. The impact of sending grossly violent or offensive material has on its victim will be considered, in the same way as it would be for someone being stalked. The impact this has on others, such as children, will also be considered an aggravating factor.

Sentencing Council member judge Rosa Dean said: ‘Our guidelines recognise and reflect the very intimate, personal and intrusive nature of these offences, which can have devastating, often long-term impacts on victims and their families.

They will provide courts with comprehensive guidance that will help ensure sentences reflect the seriousness of these offences.’

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