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John Jones Civil Engineering Fined £100k By Magistrates

John Jones Civil Engineering Fined £100k By Magistrates

By Andrew Young-
John Jones Civil Engineering has been fined the company £50,000 and ordered it to pay prosecution costs of £50,000.

The charge was brought by the Environment Agency under the Environmental Permitting (England & Wales) Regulations 2010.  It alleges that between July 2014 and October 2014, the company deposited over 5,000 tonnes of soil, stone, brick and concrete into two land hollows on land at Bage Farm, Madley. The hollows were a habitat for great-crested newts, a European protected species. The depositing of the waste had resulted in the disturbance, injury, and killing of some of the newt population.

As part of the fine the court ordered the company to pay the costs that it had avoided in failing to lawfully dispose of the waste. The company, which had a previous caution for environmental offences committed in 2010 and 2011, is rum by men with plenty of money, who have excelled in their field.

In mitigation, the company’s barrister stated that the company had pleaded guilty to the offence and had no previous convictions. He also stated that the new population had thrived in the time following the offence. John Jones Civil Engineering was established &ground works was established in 1993, and is today a major competitor in the field of engineering

They boast an expanding workforce with an abundance  of experience and expertise in engineering, and would have been expected to appreciate the importance of disposing of waste promptly.
The company, which invests in new equipment and training  has  the most recent and modern plant in the construction industry. They are loaded with fiances, but would not have welcomed the huge fine imposed on them by the courts because of their failure to meet environmental health standards.

John Jones Civil Engineering declined to comment formally in relation to the fine, but a representative told The Eye OF Media.Com that the company that the may have made a costly mistake, but said the engineering company was ”overall one of the very best of its kind in Britain”. Acting as both main contractor and subcontractor, they draw from a broad skill based workforce.  They fell foul of the law, so have to pay up, and will be more compliant next time to avoid a similar fate.

A representative of John Jones Civil Engineering told The Eye Of Media.Com that the fine will not affect the company immensely, describing it as ”a drop in the ocean for the big entrepreneurs and company bosses at the top. How much of that it merely bravado is unknown, but the fine will wake the company up to their responsibilities.

SERIOUS

Speaking after the case, Environment Officer Lyndon Essex, said: Waste crime is a serious offence with tough penalties as it can damage the environment and undermine those who operate legally. This case sends out a clear message that we will not hesitate to take action to ensure the protection of the environment.      On 3 July 2018, Hereford Magistrates’ Court fined the company £50,000 and ordered it to pay prosecution costs of £50,000.

The charge was brought by the Environment Agency under the Environmental Permitting (England & Wales) Regulations 2010.

Between July 2014 and October 2014, the company deposited over 5,000 tonnes of soil, stone, brick and concrete into two land hollows on land at Bage Farm, Madley. The hollows were a habitat for great-crested newts, a European protected species. The depositing of the waste had resulted in the disturbance, injury, and killing of some of the newt population.

As part of the fine, the court ordered the company to pay the costs that it had avoided in failing to lawfully dispose of the waste.

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